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These strategic themes of the core studios will introduce you to the most promising fields of industrial design.

Focuses
Description
Home

Concept development in the design of everyday objects used in domestic sphere.

Canada

Product design with Canadian materials and investigating the Canadian context of use.

High Tech

The North American high tech industry as a context for (interactive) product design.

Health and Wellness

Enhancing people’s quality of life in the fast growing health and wellness industry.

Sustainability and Systems

Design of product/service/systems within a sustainability challenged consumer society.

Each semester expands your focus of design, from products to interactive product/service/systems.

Focuses
Description
Year Level
context-focus_head
Products

Studio 1: The design of physical products, with an emphasis on form language, semiotics and ergonomics.

products
Materials

Studio 2: The identification, configuration and specification of materials being used in the design of products.

materials
Technologies

Studio 3: The incorporation, embodiment and configuration of (smart) technologies within objects.

technologies
Interactions

Studio 4: The design and specification of meaningful interactions between people and objects.

interactions
Systems

Studio 5: The design and configuration of objects and integration with services and systems.

systems

An iterative multi-stage process that provides structure and guidance to how you design.

Focuses
Description
Year Level
context-focus_head
Discovery

Develop a visual design vocabulary. Identify design opportunities through synthesis of trends.

discovery
Definition

Size and scope a design project, process and deliverables based on identified opportunities.

definition
Research

Apply design research methods to understand people’s needs.

research
Create

Develop concepts using creativity techniques and iteratively design of process models.

create
Finalize

Detail your design in terms of form, materials, interactions and brand design.

finalize

Context

A landscape of design themes, disciplines and process in which your learning takes place.

Themes

These strategic themes of the core studios will introduce you to the most promising fields of industrial design.

Focus

Each semester expands your focus of design, from products to interactive product/service/systems.

Process

An iterative multi-stage process that provides structure and guidance to how you design.

 
 

Domains provide a thematic clustering of your design competencies.

Focuses
 
Description
Core
core

In this domain, you learn to elicit and integrate requirements from people, technology and business into a consistently used design process.

Images
image

In this domain you learn to express yourself in all forms of visual media. This includes visual, graphic and oral communication.

Objects
objects

In this domain you learn to give shape to your ideas and develop a sensibility to form, based on a deep understanding of the process of making.

Thoughts
thoughts

In this domain, you will become able to work and think interdisciplinary and use creativity techniques and future thinking methods.

Knowledge, skills and behaviors that you must master in specific content or performance areas.

Focuses
Competencies
Description
Core
core_sm

Design Process

People

Interaction

Business

Being able to define a design process and apply design process and methods* in all stages of a design project.
* See toolbox

Being able to use qualitative design research methods & synthesis tools and be able to evaluate iteratively design results with end users.

Being able to design meaningful and satisfying interactions for interactive products/services and systems.

Understand the system of which your product /service is part of. Being able to elicit and integrate business requirements into your design process.

Images
image_sm

Visualization Techniques

CAD Visualization Techniques

Communication & Presentation

Visual Thinking

The ability to use drawing in order to to understand (‘see’) product requirements and convey three dimensionality, materiality, colors, interactions of products.

The ability to use 2D/3D drawing programs to render, detail and specify product designs, produce rapid prototypes and documentation to prepare production.

The ability to use visual (graphic design, photography) , verbal (story telling, language as tool) presentation techniques to communicate effectively with different audiences.

The ability to use drawings, diagrams, thumbnails, charts to understand the world around you to analyze and conceptualize context, products, processes and interactions.

Objects
objects_sm

Form Development

Fabrication

Digital Fabrication

3D Thinking

Develop meaningful and aesthetic form solutions through a deep, tactile understanding of materials, structure and semiotics.

 

Being able to safely use tools and fabrication processes and understanding the changing role of designers in contemporary manufacturing.

Use of digital tools and processes to conceive, develop and prototype analog and digital interactive products, services and systems.

Using an iterative process of making, sensing, testing and thinking to develop, understand and share tangible ideas.

Thoughts
thoughts_sm

Scope & Context

Thinking Typologies

Conceptual Thinking

Future Thinking

Learn to think about the social, cultural and historical context of design (research ethics, meaning of objects).

Acquire access to different thinking ways in design (e.g. intuitive, analytical, systemic, holistic, abstract, synthetic, rational) and how to bridge to other disciplines’ ways of thinking.

Acquire the use of creativity techniques (i.e. generative and evaluative thinking tools, lateral thinking methods, scenario building, concept mapping and visualization, story boarding, concept visualization techniques, system diagrams).

Learn to identify future design opportunities using trend analysis, design scenario planning and strategic design tools.

You must develop five levels before a competency is fully mastered.

Focuses
Competencies
Competency Levels
 
 

Intake

Grasp

Use

Create

Mastery

Core
core_sm

Design Process

People

Interaction

Business

Develop a basic understanding of design process, its stages and how it is used. Become accustomed with methods and tools in discovery and creation. Basic awareness of design context.

Students start to grasp the variety of methods applied in different stages of the design process, with some more depth in discovery and creation methods. Students start to relate their projects to the context* of design.

Within defined projects, students independently use methods in creation and discovery. Students understand methods to elicit and integrate people, technology, materials & business requirements in their projects.

Students are able to size, scope and define a design process with given tools and methods. Students are able to integrate business, technology and manufacturing requirements in their creations.

Students are now able to fully define and create their own process and adjust design methods to serve specific goals. Students are able to adapt their design process to changing circumstances.

Develop a basic understanding of people’s functional and emotional needs and acquire an overview of methods* to elicit these needs and how these methods are used in the design process.

Develop a deeper understanding of people’s functional and emotional needs, understand and apply some of the methods*to elicit needs and use resulting insights in the design process.

Within defined projects, students independently elicit, organize, prioritize and synthesize functional and emotional needs of one group of users using methods of choice into a design brief.

Within a given project, students can elicit functional and emotional needs of different stakeholder groups by themselves and organize and integrate different requirements in a design brief.

Research Ethics: Students will be able to identify research ethics issues and apply basic research ethics principles. (included in research methods, not into core) Students can apply ethical responsible research to their specific project.

Students can define and develop their own projects based on their framing of user insights and are able to iteratively engage with users in all stages of the design process.

Research ethics: students can independently apply research ethics in their project and apply for research ethics approval when their project specifics require so.

The student will become aware of the need for designing interactions (between people, products and services) and the principal interaction design tools.

Within the confines of an assignment, students will be able to design consistent, pleasing interactions of a physical product with an incorporated screen using basic storyboards, flowchart and screen mock-ups.

Within a defined project students are able to independently design detailed interactions of a interactive product, using some interaction design tools using detailed storyboards, flowchart and interactive product simulation software.

Within their own project, students can use a wider variety of interaction design tools independently to design desirable and meaningful interactions with products, services and systems. Students can communicate specifications to programmers.

Within their own projects, students can adjust, adapt interaction design tools to design, specify & communicate desired interactions that meet their specific project objectives and interact with programmers and fabricators.

Students become aware of the client – designer relationship and acquire a general sense of how a business operates.

Students become able to elicit business requirements for their project and become aware of the role of the different business functions that interact with design.

Students are able to fully articulate the value proposition of their design project to their prospective client – within a given project.

Students are able to design projects while fully incorporating business sense and requirements, interacting with clients at each stage of the project.

Students are able to analyze the business model of their (prospective) client and can actively add value to this model through their design.

 
 

Intake

Grasp

Use

Create

Mastery

Images
image_sm

Visualization Techniques

CAD Visualization Techniques

Communication & Presentation

Visual Thinking

Understanding the importance of drawing (theory) and underlying principles (seeing, three dimensionality).

Hand on exercises in drawing deepens students’ understanding. Student starts to ‘see’. Students starts to develop a sensitivity to three dimensionality, expression of form, materials with simple objects.

With some support of the instructor, students can develop a drawing. With ‘cues’, the student is able to ‘see’. Student can render more developed three dimensions, materials and colors of more complex products.

The ability to draw independently, using given techniques in new projects. Students are able to ‘see. Students can generate the illusion of three dimensionality, using different drawing techniques.

Student has developed his/her own drawing style and techniques and, based upon original observation is able to fluently evoke form, materials, colors and textures.

Understand basic rules and processes in the safe operation of tools and machines while gaining a broad and general understanding of safety.

Gain a basic understanding of how tools and machines operate toward a specific purpose while becoming aware of the roles that designers play in the making processes.

Within well defined, smaller exercises, students begin to develop a deeper contextual understanding of the risks associated with the safe use of tools and machines, their components, how they are used in practice and begin to grasp what making/building entails. 

Within the context of an assignment students develop the basic ability to safely apply principles of tools and machines without specific instruction.

Students become aware of the many facets of making/fabrication and conscious of their own strengths and where they need assistance.

In a safe and efficient manner students can use most tools and machines independently while working on their own projects and become aware of more advanced fabrication processes and how to access them.

Students have mastered and internalized [most] fabrication techniques/processes and are now free to explore and synthesize new combined ways of fabricating by integrating and collaborating with other manufacturing processes.

Students are being introduced to communication and presentation tools and techniques (basic graphic design, visual and verbal presentation skills and use of photography).

Hands on experimentation with basic communication and presentation formats will foster a deeper understanding and the beginning of applying this knowledge in their work.

With some guidance, students are able to use communication and presentation strategies in discussions with teachers and peers.

Students learn to independently use different communication and presentation methods (both verbal, visual and graphical) to present themselves, their projects, their project progress to elicit feedback from end users and clients.

Students use presentation and communication techniques (both verbal, visual and graphical) to present themselves, their projects, their project progress to create an effective dialogue with clients, end users and other stakeholders, generating a learning feedback cycle.

Basic understanding of visual thinking tools, processes and techniques to analyze (context) and conceptualize ideas.

Experimentation with visual thinking tools and techniques leads to a deeper insight of the role of visual thinking in the design process.

With some guidance, students can apply some visual thinking techniques within defined projects, both in an analytical as in a conceptual way.

Students can use existing visual thinking techniques in analysis and conceptualization in new projects, defining directions, developing ideas and communicating with colleagues.

Students can fluently use drawings, diagrams, thumbnails, charts to understand the world around them and to analyze, conceptualize context, products, processes and interactions. Students are able to do this individual, collaborative and in sessions with their clients.

 
 

Intake

Grasp

Use

Create

Mastery

Objects
objects_sm

Form Development

Fabrication

Digital Fabrication

3D Thinking

Through basic exercises students gain a theoretical understanding of the drivers that are used in the form creation process. [making, structure, basic engineering aesthetic language, needs etc.].

Within well-defined exercises students are asked to experiment in advanced form creation while integrating most of the form drivers (aesthetics, materials, and structures, forces, making, basic engineering, aesthetic language, needs etc.].

Students start to develop their own voice in form development [critical ideas, preference in materials etc.] while working within the constraints of structure and materials and apply role of semiotics within the development of a project.

Students are able to express ideas in 3-D within the context of a project while integrating all the form drivers as well as semiotics and materials synthesis.

Within their own projects students have internalized all form drivers in the creation process and can integrate new external form drivers [for example new materials, new systemic requirements etc.]

Understand basic rules and processes in the safe operation of tools and machines while gaining a broad and general understanding of safety.

Gain a basic understanding of how tools and machines operate toward a specific purpose while becoming aware of the roles that designers play in the making processes.

Within well defined, smaller exercises, students begin to develop a deeper contextual understanding of the risks associated with the safe use of tools and machines, their components, how they are used in practice and begin to grasp what making/building entails. 

Within the context of an assignment students develop the basic ability to safely apply principles of tools and machines without specific instruction.

Students become aware of the many facets of making/fabrication and conscious of their own strengths and where they need assistance.

In a safe and efficient manner students can use most tools and machines independently while working on their own projects and become aware of more advanced fabrication processes and how to access them.

Students have mastered and internalized [most] fabrication techniques/processes and are now free to explore and synthesize new combined ways of fabricating by integrating and collaborating with other manufacturing processes.

Students understand how software and hardware are used to conceive analog products using rapid prototyping and how digital enabled products are created [Sensor, programming, wiring etc.].

Within well-defined exercises students begin to experiment with basic digital technology (rapid prototyping) in the process of developing form solutions. Students start to grasp the way digital technologies are embedded in contemporary products.

Students can wire basic technology components together in a technical mock up. Students can write simple code in open source software language.

Within their own projects, students can wire basic technology components together and test, iterate their designs and write simple code in open source software language.

Within their own projects, students can prototype, code and test technical mock ups to fine tune desired interactions.

The student becomes aware of all the spatial thinking processes that are engaged in designing/making and understands how the iterative process of spatial thinking is different than analyzed or theoretical material thinking.

Within a well-defined 3-D thinking exercise, students [with instruction] can use an iterative process to develop tangible ideas embedded in the iterative process of designing/making.

The student develops the ability to think in 3-D as well as a sequencing process in their mind and imagination.

The students thinking becomes a driver in the making process and is able to demonstrate an understanding of proportions, assembly, sequence.

The student can apply the method of [make–think] and [think–make] in an iterative process within the context of a defined project.

The student has internalized the iterative process of 3D thinking and is able to integrate and synthesize external thought in the development of ideas.

 
 

Intake

Grasp

Use

Create

Mastery

Thoughts
thoughts_sm

Scope & Context

Thinking Typologies

Conceptual Thinking

Future Thinking

Students gain a cursory understanding of the socio cultural and historical context of design.

Students learn the principles of how a professional design practice operates.

Within well-defined instructions students are able to evaluate their design projects within a socio cultural & historical context.

Students are able to express their (desired) role as a design practitioner.

With some instruction, students understand how socio cultural issues affect their projects.

Students are able to articulate their value proposition as a design practitioner to a business client.

Students are able to independently identify some socio cultural issues as drivers to their projects.

Students are able to analyze the business model of their client and tune their design it.

Students can contextualize their projects and activities to a wide spectrum of socio cultural issues. Students are able to synthesize the larger eco system in which their business client operates.

Students are able to recall different thinking ways in design and how stakeholders in other disciplines (i.e. business, engineering, public sector) think.

Students start to grasp some of their thinking styles they employ these in some stages of the design process. Students start to understand how to relate to other stakeholders thinking.

Students are able to understand all their different thinking styles in all stages of the design process and identify and respond to how other stakeholders think.

Students are able to switch between different ways of thinking when a situation requires it and interact with ease with other stakeholder’s ways of thinking.

Students are able to anticipate, observe, and switch seamless between different ways of thinking when a situation requires it and can interact with ease and confidence with other stakeholder’s ways of thinking.

Students can recall most creativity tools and techniques and can explain where in the design process these tools and techniques are used.

Within well-defined exercises students are able to apply some conceptual tools and techniques within given (group) design projects.

With some instruction, students are able to apply most conceptual tools and techniques in given (group) design projects.

Within their own design projects, students can apply given conceptual tools and techniques independently.

Within their own projects, students start to experiment in adjusting and fine tuning conceptual tools and techniques to the specifics of their own design projects.

Students can recall future design tools and techniques and are able to explain where in the design process these tools are used and what specific benefits the outcome has for a client.

Within well-defined exercises students are able to apply some future design tools and techniques within given (group) design projects and jointly identify and articulate design opportunities for a client.

With some instruction, students are able to apply most future design tools tools and techniques in given (group) design projects and identify, articulate and present design opportunities to a client.

Within their own design projects, students can apply given future design tools and techniques independently.

Within their own projects, students start to experiment in adjusting and fine tuning future design tools and techniques to the specifics of their own design projects.

These are named ‘meta’ because they involve you at a higher abstraction level.

Program Competency Description
Self Learn

Being a self-learner is about having intrinsic motivation and courage, which drives you to experiment, iterate and take risk on going. You reflect on what you learn throughout this process and redirect when necessary.

Synthesize

A synthesizer ‘senses’ possible connections and relationships based on intuition and past experiences. A synthesizer is a systems thinker and uses visualization techniques to articulate and connect the dots, either felt or thought.

Original

Being original is about the ability to continuously collect experiences (design solutions, references but also analogies, metaphors) and uses these as ingredients to forge new and unexpected connections when creating new concepts.

Collaboration

A collaborator can interact well with different kinds of people and bridges to different processes in other disciplines. A collaborator is able to adapt to different ways of thinking and can use story telling to connect to diverse audiences.

Competencies

A framework of design competencies & learning outcomes that defines your learning.

Domains

Domains provide a thematic clustering of your design competencies.

Design Competencies

Knowledge, skills and behaviors that you must master in specific content or performance areas.

Competency Levels

You must develop five levels before a competency is fully mastered.

Meta Competencies

These are named ‘meta’ because they involve you at a higher abstraction level.

 
  • Program
  • Progression
  • Courses

Industrial Design is a four-year program that comprises of a series of interrelated courses.

You will develop competency levels progressively, from one course to the other.

A 12-week series of classes in which you develop competency levels in a specific domain. You may download all the course outlines here or download the individual ones below. Download All

  • Domains
  • Course Code
  • Course Title
  • Course Outline
  • Core
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  • INDS 1B01
  • ID Studio 1: Design of Everyday Things
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  • INDS 2B15
  • ID Studio 2: Design for Private Space
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  • INDS 2B19
  • ID Studio 3: Emerging Technologies
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  • INDS 3B28
  • ID Studio 4: Design for Healthcare
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  • INDS 3B33
  • ID Studio 5: Sustainability & Systems
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  • INDS 4C01
  • Meta Project 1
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  • INDS 4C02
  • Meta Project 2
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  • INDS 4C03
  • ID Studio 6: Product Design 1
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  • INDS 4C04
  • ID Studio 7: Product Design 2
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  • Images
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  • GDES 1B24
  • Colour and 2D Design
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  • GDES 1B22
  • Drawing for ID & MAAD
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  • GDES 1B29
  • Drawing for Industrial Design
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  • INDS 2B16
  • Presentation & Communication for ID
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  • INDS 2B12
  • Advanced Drawing for 3D Design
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  • GDEX 3B15
  • Drawing for Manufacturing
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  • Objects
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  • GDES 1B25
  • Form & Structure
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  • INDS 1B02
  • Material Explorations 1
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  • GART 1B70
  • Creative Process: Art & Code
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  • INDS 2B17
  • Material Explorations 2
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  • INDS 2B18
  • Material Explorations 3
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  • Thoughts
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  • GDES 2B03
  • Think Tank 1: Awareness
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  • INDS 3B25
  • Conceptual Tools and Techiniques
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  • INDS 3B31
  • Activist Design
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  • INDS 3B09
  • Reseach Methodologies for ID
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  • INDS 4B07
  • Context & Departure Points
  • Future
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  • INDS 3B32
  • Connections/Case Studies
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  • INDS 3B34
  • Connections/Internship
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  • INDS 4B09
  • Professional Preparation
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Curriculum

A didactic structure that enables a student to learn Industrial Design.

Program

Industrial Design is a four-year program that comprises of a series of interrelated courses.

Progression

You will develop competency levels progressively, from one course to the other.

Courses

A 12-week series of classes in which you develop competency levels in a specific domain.

 
  • Name
  • Competency Profile
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  • Avery, Joshua
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  • Belcher, Brett
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  • Campbell, Mark
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  • Coppin, Peter
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  • Croteau, Dianne
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  • Dywan, Beverly
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  • Epp, Paul
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  • Garvin, Richard
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  • Goss, Jules
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  • Hejazi, Bahar Mousavi
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  • Jones, Janet
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  • Keller, Miles
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  • Kuisma, John
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  • Lee, Ranee
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  • Mahler, Harry
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  • Manu, Alexander
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  • Maxwell, James
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  • Munroe, Howard
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  • P
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  • Paschke, Brian
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  • Peteran, Gordon
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  • Q
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  • Quan, David
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  • R
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  • Rampen, Edmond
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  • Rutgers, Job
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  • Seeschaaf Veres, Angelika
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  • Sellen, Kate
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  • Tompkins, Katrina
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  • Tonizzo, Davide
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  • Tranum, Sarah
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  • W
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  • White, Kirsten
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  • Wilcox, Phil
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People

 

  • Description
  • Link / Download
  • Bibliography
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  • Toolkit
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  • ID Toolkit
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Resources